YOUR GREATER SPOKANE AND INLAND NORTHWEST AREA DERMATOLOGY  EXPERTS

Our experienced and accredited team dedicates themselves to your lifelong skin care journey with vast expertise in dermatology — from treating acne to cosmetic dermatology to skin cancer surgery.

medical dermatology

Advanced Dermatology & Skin Surgery’s Board-Certified Dermatologists and Skin Care Providers treat your skin with the highest level of care. Click here to learn more about our medical dermatology services and various skin conditions.

skin cancer & mohs micrographic surgery

Our  Fellowship-Trained Mohs surgeons,  Board-Certified Dermatologists, and specially trained dermatology experts work with you to effectively diagnose and treat your skin cancer. Click here to learn more about the Mohs procedure.

Cosmetic Dermatology

Our leading-edge cosmetic treatments range from injectables, to lasers to clinical-grade peels and cosmetic surgery. Click here to get to know our Cosmetic Dermatology offerings.

Maggie Callan, MPAS, PA-C, recently joined our team. She’s a #WallaWalla native who loves the outdoors. Maggie shared a few interesting insights on the many roles of the skin and how a wound heals. 

Q: Tell us the most interesting fact about dermatology that the average Joe doesn’t know.
A: Skin has many essential functions including regulating our temperature. In warm temperatures, we can thank our skin for acting as a cooling system. You see, when sweat is excreted onto the skin’s surface and evaporated, it transfers heat out of the body. In colder temperatures, our blood vessels constrict allowing us to retain heat. At any given time, up to 25% of the body’s blood is circulating through the dermis of our skin allowing this process to become so efficient. Basically, we have a built-in thermostat where our body can detect the temperature, and our skin adjusts accordingly. How neat is that! 

Q: What is another interesting fact about dermatology?
A: Wound healing is quite fascinating. After an insult to the skin resulting in a wound, the healing process is triggered. This explains the redness and inflammation you can visualize around the wound. Your body transports oxygen, nutrients, platelets, and white blood cells through the blood to control bleeding, clean up debris, and encourage growth. Eventually, the body creates new blood vessels from the base of the wound and cells that produce collagen migrate to the area to strengthen the new tissue. Cells migrate in from the wound margins, and in time with the right environment, your body can repair itself.

How cool are these insights! Thank you for breaking it down for us, Maggie.

#MeetAdvancedDerm
Maggie Callan, MPAS, PA-C, recently joined our team. She’s a #WallaWalla native who loves the outdoors. Maggie shared a few interesting insights on the many roles of the skin and how a wound heals. Q: Tell us the most interesting fact about dermatology that the average Joe doesn’t know. A: Skin has many essential functions including regulating our temperature. In warm temperatures, we can thank our skin for acting as a cooling system. You see, when sweat is excreted onto the skin’s surface and evaporated, it transfers heat out of the body. In colder temperatures, our blood vessels constrict allowing us to retain heat. At any given time, up to 25% of the body’s blood is circulating through the dermis of our skin allowing this process to become so efficient. Basically, we have a built-in thermostat where our body can detect the temperature, and our skin adjusts accordingly. How neat is that! Q: What is another interesting fact about dermatology? A: Wound healing is quite fascinating. After an insult to the skin resulting in a wound, the healing process is triggered. This explains the redness and inflammation you can visualize around the wound. Your body transports oxygen, nutrients, platelets, and white blood cells through the blood to control bleeding, clean up debris, and encourage growth. Eventually, the body creates new blood vessels from the base of the wound and cells that produce collagen migrate to the area to strengthen the new tissue. Cells migrate in from the wound margins, and in time with the right environment, your body can repair itself. How cool are these insights! Thank you for breaking it down for us, Maggie. #MeetAdvancedDerm